Miley Twerking On Things We Should Talk About

If she's twerking on it, maybe we'll pay attention.

The 1963 march on Washington - then known as the “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom” - was indeed the culmination of a massive decades-long struggle for racial and economic equality, creating a historic stage for Dr. King’s famed "I Have a Dream" speech. 
Instrumental as the key organizer of the march was a man working behind the scenes named Bayard Rustin (twerked on above), a controversial figure at the heart of the Civil Rights movement who recently posthumously received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from Barack Obama.
Rustin was attacked on the floor of the Senate by (then Dixiecrat, later turned Republican) segregationist Senator Strom Thurmond, who sought to draw division and discredit the Civil Rights movement through its affiliation with Rustin, a man he denounced as a "Communist, draft-dodger and homosexual."
In truth, Rustin was one of the core organizers of the Civil Rights movement and the right-wing segregationists worst nightmare. He was not only black, but openly gay, a pacifist, a former member of the Communist Party, and a continued vocal socialist. Thurmond wasn’t exactly factually incorrect, but his smear campaign failed to deter the momentum of the movement. Yes, a gay black Marxist was one of Dr. King’s key partners in the Civil Rights movement and a chief architect behind one of the most significant days in our nation’s history. And there’s nothing wrong with that.
Maybe if the world had more gay black Marxists, it would be a better place.

The 1963 march on Washington - then known as the “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom” - was indeed the culmination of a massive decades-long struggle for racial and economic equality, creating a historic stage for Dr. King’s famed "I Have a Dream" speech. 

Instrumental as the key organizer of the march was a man working behind the scenes named Bayard Rustin (twerked on above), a controversial figure at the heart of the Civil Rights movement who recently posthumously received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from Barack Obama.

Rustin was attacked on the floor of the Senate by (then Dixiecrat, later turned Republican) segregationist Senator Strom Thurmond, who sought to draw division and discredit the Civil Rights movement through its affiliation with Rustin, a man he denounced as a "Communist, draft-dodger and homosexual."

In truth, Rustin was one of the core organizers of the Civil Rights movement and the right-wing segregationists worst nightmare. He was not only black, but openly gay, a pacifist, a former member of the Communist Party, and a continued vocal socialist. Thurmond wasn’t exactly factually incorrect, but his smear campaign failed to deter the momentum of the movement. Yes, a gay black Marxist was one of Dr. King’s key partners in the Civil Rights movement and a chief architect behind one of the most significant days in our nation’s history. And there’s nothing wrong with that.

Maybe if the world had more gay black Marxists, it would be a better place.