Miley Twerking On Things We Should Talk About

If she's twerking on it, maybe we'll pay attention.

Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Seymour Hersh told The Guardian that the official story about the killing of Osama bin Laden is completely false.
‘“Nothing’s been done about that story, it’s one big lie, not one word of it is true,” he says of the dramatic US Navy Seals raid in 2011.
Hersh is writing a book about national security and has devoted a chapter to the bin Laden killing. He says a recent report put out by an “independent” Pakistani commission about life in the Abottabad compound in which Bin Laden was holed up would not stand up to scrutiny. “The Pakistanis put out a report, don’t get me going on it. Let’s put it this way, it was done with considerable American input. It’s a bullshit report…”’
http://www.theguardian.com/media/media-blog/2013/sep/27/seymour-hersh-obama-nsa-american-media

Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Seymour Hersh told The Guardian that the official story about the killing of Osama bin Laden is completely false.

‘“Nothing’s been done about that story, it’s one big lie, not one word of it is true,” he says of the dramatic US Navy Seals raid in 2011.

Hersh is writing a book about national security and has devoted a chapter to the bin Laden killing. He says a recent report put out by an “independent” Pakistani commission about life in the Abottabad compound in which Bin Laden was holed up would not stand up to scrutiny. “The Pakistanis put out a report, don’t get me going on it. Let’s put it this way, it was done with considerable American input. It’s a bullshit report…”’

http://www.theguardian.com/media/media-blog/2013/sep/27/seymour-hersh-obama-nsa-american-media

On September 17, 2011 a national movement was sparked to challenge the control of the ruling class over our political and economic system. Filling a vacuum left by Obama’s shift towards the political center, the Occupy Wall Street movement used populist language of “The 99% vs. The 1%” to draw attention to the nation’s increasingly astronomical wealth gap and the failure of either political party’s ability to contest the rule of the economic elite and the corporate-controlled system they continue to benefit from.
Now, nearly two years after the Occupy movement was systemically repressed by police forces under control of Democratic mayors, the very conditions that spawned movement remain in place for much of the American population.
http://occupywallst.org/

On September 17, 2011 a national movement was sparked to challenge the control of the ruling class over our political and economic system. Filling a vacuum left by Obama’s shift towards the political center, the Occupy Wall Street movement used populist language of “The 99% vs. The 1%” to draw attention to the nation’s increasingly astronomical wealth gap and the failure of either political party’s ability to contest the rule of the economic elite and the corporate-controlled system they continue to benefit from.

Now, nearly two years after the Occupy movement was systemically repressed by police forces under control of Democratic mayors, the very conditions that spawned movement remain in place for much of the American population.


http://occupywallst.org/

Something you won’t find on CNN:
"Nobel Peace Prize laurete, Mairead Maguire tells her account of her visit to Syria. While Maguire was in Syria she discovered that the people the U.S. are funding are violent groups and do not want peace in Syria. Her her view is that Syria is being used as a proxy war by the U.S., Great Britain, Saudi Arabia and Qatar."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msA35ATXol8

Something you won’t find on CNN:

"Nobel Peace Prize laurete, Mairead Maguire tells her account of her visit to Syria. While Maguire was in Syria she discovered that the people the U.S. are funding are violent groups and do not want peace in Syria. Her her view is that Syria is being used as a proxy war by the U.S., Great Britain, Saudi Arabia and Qatar."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msA35ATXol8

Criminalizing people for using drugs is our society’s way of neglecting stressed and abused children once they’ve reached legal adulthood.

'Children who endure trauma often grow up to have insufficient supplies of certain essential “reward” chemicals in the brain, such as endorphins and dopamine — the very chemicals that drugs of abuse either supplant or enhance. The core assumption of the war on drugs that addicts freely “choose” their habits and could “just say no” is a cruel mockery of the reality of [an addict]’s existence, as is the belief that imposing negative consequences on traumatized people will somehow force them to give up their addiction. If that were the case, [addicts] would have recovered long ago. Chronic drug use further impairs the addict’s capacity for rational decision-making.
The scientific literature makes clear that emotional stress is the most consistent trigger for addictive behaviours. How does that affect people…? A study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association concluded that “a history of childhood abuse per se is related to increased [nervous and hormonal] stress reactivity, which is further enhanced when additional trauma is experienced in adulthood.” The point is that the addict is retraumatized over and over again by ostracism, harassment, dire poverty, disease, the frantic hunt for a source of the substance of dependence, the violence of the underground drug world and harsh chastisement at the hands of the law — all consequences of the war on drugs.’

What is it that makes these chemicals so appealing? Rather than generating further anxiety with the domestic and international war on drugs, we could be asking why people use drugs in the first place and perhaps working to find another way to fill the psycho-physiological vacuum of compassion that any number of illicit substances now comfortably occupies.
"Stop Treating Drug Users as Criminals"

Criminalizing people for using drugs is our society’s way of neglecting stressed and abused children once they’ve reached legal adulthood.

'Children who endure trauma often grow up to have insufficient supplies of certain essential “reward” chemicals in the brain, such as endorphins and dopamine — the very chemicals that drugs of abuse either supplant or enhance. The core assumption of the war on drugs that addicts freely “choose” their habits and could “just say no” is a cruel mockery of the reality of [an addict]’s existence, as is the belief that imposing negative consequences on traumatized people will somehow force them to give up their addiction. If that were the case, [addicts] would have recovered long ago. Chronic drug use further impairs the addict’s capacity for rational decision-making.

The scientific literature makes clear that emotional stress is the most consistent trigger for addictive behaviours. How does that affect people…? A study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association concluded that “a history of childhood abuse per se is related to increased [nervous and hormonal] stress reactivity, which is further enhanced when additional trauma is experienced in adulthood.” The point is that the addict is retraumatized over and over again by ostracism, harassment, dire poverty, disease, the frantic hunt for a source of the substance of dependence, the violence of the underground drug world and harsh chastisement at the hands of the law — all consequences of the war on drugs.’

What is it that makes these chemicals so appealing? Rather than generating further anxiety with the domestic and international war on drugs, we could be asking why people use drugs in the first place and perhaps working to find another way to fill the psycho-physiological vacuum of compassion that any number of illicit substances now comfortably occupies.

"Stop Treating Drug Users as Criminals"